Lake Monsters

Monsters of Africa: The Ninki Nanka!

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The Ninki Nanka is from West African folklore. It is said to have the head of a horse with three horns; two horns point out or backward and the third central horn points forward. It has the neck of a giraffe and the body of a crocodile.
According to legend, it mostly feeds on cocky children; it is extremely large and dangerous and when children disobey their parents and go into the swamp by themselves, they fall victim to the Ninki Nanka.
It is also seen as an omen of imminent death. Nearly everyone who has claimed to have seen it has died shortly afterward.
It is possible that the beast may have been inspired by dinosaur fossils—Africa has been a rich source of sauropod bones.

Dragons of South America: Bachue’!

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Bachue’ is a mother goddess from Muisca Colombian mythology. She is the mother of humanity, and emerged from Lake Iguaque with a baby in her arms, who grew up to become her husband. The two populated the earth, and after creating all of humanity, they turned into serpents and returned to the now-sacred lagoon from which they arose.

Her name means “she who has naked breasts”, and she also watches over the crops that sustain man.

It is believed that Bachue’ returns on occasion to guide her people.

 

 

Dragons of Europe: Melusine!

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In the time of the Crusades, Elynas, the King of Albany (an old name for Scotland orAlba), went hunting one day and came across a beautiful lady in the forest. She was Pressyne, mother of Melusine. It is not clear whether he knew that she was of faierie blood. He persuaded her to marry him and she agreed, only on the promise that he must not enter her chamber when she birthed or bathed her children.  Pressyne gave birth to triplet daughters. When he violated this taboo, Pressyne left the kingdom, together with her three children—Melusine, Melior, and Palatyne— and traveled to the lost Isle of Avalon.

The three girls grew up in Avalon. On their fifteenth birthday, Melusine, the eldest, inquired as to why they had been brought to Avalon. Upon hearing of their father’s broken promise, Melusine sought revenge. She and her sisters captured Elynas and locked him, with his riches, in a mountain. Pressyne became enraged when she learned what the girls had done, and punished them for their dishonor to their father. Melusine was condemned to take the form of a serpent from the waist down every Saturday. In other stories, she takes on the form of a mermaid.

Raymond of Poitou came across Melusine in a forest of Coulombiers in Poitou in France, and proposed marriage. Just as her mother had done, she laid a condition: that he must never enter her chamber on a Saturday. He broke the promise and saw her in the form of a part-woman, part-serpent, but she forgave him. When, during a disagreement, he called her a “serpent” in front of his court, she assumed the form of a dragon, provided him with two magic rings, and flew off, never to return.

Happy Easter: Celebrating Monstrous Eggs!

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Happy Easter, everyone! Well, this year our glorious egg-filled holiday sneaked up on me,plus we have had a tragedy in our group of friends. I am trying to just be constructive today because I was not able to attend a visitation. When you have an animal rescue, you just can’t get up and go where you need to go that easily.
Anyway, with that said, let’s delve into some of my favorite EGGS from film and TV:

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Dragons of North America: Amhuluk!

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Lately my paintings are not coming out well on my scanner. I can take good photos of them, but excuse the paper edges and errant shadow!
The monster Amhuluk, whose home is a lake near Forked Mountain, Oregon, had but one passion-to catch and drown all things; and when a person looks into the lake, one can see that Amhuluk has even drowned the sky in it, and has made the trees stand upside down in the water.  According a legend he impaled children on his horns and dragged them into the depths.

Needless to say, Amhuluk is a handy character to tell children about to keep them away from the water.